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Transportation: Using TRID

TRID

TRID (Transportation Research Board Database) is the main database for finding transportation related literature. It contains citations to articles, books, government documents, reports, and more. This page offers information on how to use TRID effectively, and accessing materials you find in TRID from the Portland State Library.

On this page:

Searching TRID

Use the basic search on TRID's home page.

TRID Homepage screenshot

The search results page includes filters to further refine your search.

TRID Search Results Page Screenshot

TRID Subject Area Selection ScreenshotSelect one or more (ctrl+click for more than one) Subject Areas to further refine your search, and then click on "apply."

TRID Index Terms Screenshot

 

 

Another good option for filtering is to use Index Terms. These can help to narrow a search, but sometimes they create searches that are too narrow. Start typing in your term, and select the appropriate suggested index term, and then click on "apply." You may use more than one term. (TRID uses the "or" Boolean operator between index terms.) This means that selecting more than one index term can be a helpful strategy to avoid narrowing too much.

Do not select the "limit results to free or fee-based full-text links." Remember, as a PSU community member, you can find & request many of the "fee-based" items from the PSU Library at no cost.

To clear your filters, simply click on the "clear" button.

Viewing Results and Finding Full Text

Clicking on a result's title will show you a detailed record where the filter previously appeared.

TRID Record View Screenshot

To revert back to a view of selected filters, simply click on "filters" next to the search box.

TRID Filter button screenshot

TRID Record URL Screenshot

Many documents in TRID are published by governmental agencies or other organizations, and can be readily obtained online. In this case you should see a "record URL" that will link you to the freely available document.

Items in journals or other publications also have record URLs. If you are on campus and the PSU Library subscribes to the resource, these links should take you to a page for full-text access. If you are not on campus, you will need to make note of the document's citation information, and search for the article using Google Scholar from the PSU Library website.

TRID Database

TRID FAQs

What is TRID?

TRID is an indexing and abstracts database that contains record from the Transportation Research Board's (TRB) Transportation Research Information Services (TRIS) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Joint Transportation Research Center's International Transport Research Documentation (ITRD) Database. The database contains citations to journal articles, conference proceedings, current and past projects, government and organizational reports, books, and more. 

Why Use TRID?

Using TRID allows you to search within only transportation related literature. TRID contains information and documents about ongoing projects as well as reports that are not indexed in any other research database. 

Why doesn't TRID link to the PSU Library's subscriptions?

TRID is a resource offered at no cost to the user. While it works well for hard-to-find documents, you will have to take an extra step to get to the books, articles, and other resources you find. This page highlights for you how to do so.

If you have an article citation...

You can use an article citation to get the full text. 

Ex.: Baron, R. M., & Kenny, D. A. (1986). The moderator–mediator variable distinction in social psychological research: Conceptual, strategic, and statistical considerations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51(6), 1173-1182

Option 1: 

Search the PSU Library using the article title as your search:

Screenshot of library homepage search box with article title entered

 


Option 2:

Enter the article title in Google Scholar, then click on Find it @ PSU:

screenshot of Google Scholar article search

 


Then...

Both methods provide links to the full text article, under the "View Online" tab:

screenshot of link to full text article from library catalog

 


Not available?

Try searching for the journal and then searching or browsing for the article. If the Library does not have access to the volume of the journal needed, submit an article request via Interlibrary Loan.

screenshot of journals link on library website

 

screenshot of journal search